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Items for sale at That Old Blue Door

Nothing says spring like a bit of green and some floral décor. And That Old Blue Door, located in downtown White Bear Lake, has what you need to put a little spring in your decorating step.  

Longtime Mahtomedi resident Joe Ferrazzo recently opened up a Device PitStop shop in Maplewood.

There’s no denying the allure of a frozen yogurt shop; piling a cup high with your favorite flavors and topping it off with your own unique concoction of candies and crunchy toppings is heavenly. But what happens when you couple that with savory meal options and alcoholic beverages, too?

Seventy years ago, Mike Abbott was working with his father, a painting contractor, and recognized the need for good customer service at paint shops.

It might seem that fashion shows are reserved for cosmopolitan cities such as New York, Paris or Milan, but White Bear Lake has its own slice of first-class fashion, thanks to Tyler Conrad and Kim Schoonover.

“I saw an ad in the [local newspaper] on September 11, 2001, that they were starting up a wood carving club over at the senior center, so I decided to check it out,” says Larry Carlson, member of the 9/11 Wood Carvers club, as he reminisces about how the 13-year-old organization got its start.

Here’s a sweet expansion that’s bound to delight.

Spring is upon us and with it come occasions that call for gifting. We turned to White Bear Jewelers and Joel B. Sherburne Jewelers for sparkling and shimmering suggestions to wow every mom, dad and grad. After all, it don’t mean a thing if you ain’t got that bling.

Looking to give your wardrobe a little zip? Check out downtown White Bear Lake’s new and very stylish additions.

Lakes are natural works of art. Poets have written about them, singers have sung about them and many people, especially around this neck of the woods, have fond memories of days spent in their crystalline waters and along their shores.

Quilting is one of those magical crafts: a perfect blend of practical—keeping your bed toasty during those long Minnesota winters—and beautiful.

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