Shops & Business

First Presbyterian Church rummage sale

For the 115th year of their 155 years serving the White Bear area, First Presbyterian Church in White Bear Lake will be holding a spring rummage sale.

As an entrepreneur looking to sell leisure products to hockey fans and hockey players, Landon Johnson has a major advantage: He knows how fans and players think because he has been both of those things for most of his 30 years.

Accompanied by a pianist and an accordion player, the Silver Harmony Singers, which includes 17 men and 34 women, put on a great show. With the singers from age 60 to their 90s, the tunes of yesteryear are a must.  

The Olive Branch Oil & Spice Co. in downtown White Bear Lake, offers a treasure trove of oils, spices and seasonings perfect for any dish.

White Bear Lake resident Jill Hazel stumbled upon papermaking about 20 years ago, when she saw a mold in a craft store. She took it home and started working with it, and soon her dad made her papermaking equipment—a larger, custom mold and deckle.

Beach School was originally formed in the spring of 1883 as Ramsey County Rural School District 26 and was located on the Brachvogel family farm; it remained at that site for 15 years before being relocated to Portland Avenue.

“Less Judge Smails, more Happy Gilmore.” That's the marketing slogan/mission statement of Swannies Inc., a new lifestyle brand for young and casual golfers that was launched two years ago by White Bear Lake natives Matt Stang and Sam Swanson, a

Chuck & Don’s is making pet care easier with their new delivery service. “What we wanted to do was to be able to offer our shoppers the same service that they could get online,” says president and CEO Bob Hartzell.

Lake Area Bank is holding its second annual backpack drive this August.

Giving Gardens is the link between people in need and people who want to make a difference in their community.

Union Cemetery, located just south of Highway 96 West, began humbly as a few family graves on the William W. Webber farm in the 1860s. By 1877, it was apparent that the community needed a non-denominational option, and Webber incorporated the cemetery.

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