Shops & Business

First Presbyterian Church rummage sale

For the 115th year of their 155 years serving the White Bear area, First Presbyterian Church in White Bear Lake will be holding a spring rummage sale.

Carol Letourneau, a 40-year hairstyling veteran and previous owner of Special Effects Salon in downtown White Bear Lake, constantly strives to make a difference in the community; she’s sponsored community sports teams and sold jewelry in her shop to benefit Haiti. And since St.

Fishing has always been able to pull visitors and residents to the waters of White Bear and Bald Eagle lakes. If we reach back to the days of the woodland Indians, we find references to the bounty of fish found in the lakes of our area.

White Bear Lake Fire Department
The Department

Though food shelves often take the spotlight during winter holidays, keeping them full is a year-round job. No one knows this better than Kellie Cardinal, community resource center director for St.

Billy Pilacinski, a sixth-grader at St. Mary of the Lake, wasn’t surprised when his schoolmates opted to shave their heads at Indulge Salon to show their support for him this past winter.

Lakes are natural works of art. Poets have written about them, singers have sung about them and many people, especially around this neck of the woods, have fond memories of days spent in their crystalline waters and along their shores.

The Minnesota State High School Hockey Tournament has long been a tradition for White Bear Lake, despite the fact that since the inaugural tournament in 1945, the Bears have not made it past the consolation round.  

By day, Trent Fleury is a help desk administrator at a custom metalwork company. Nights and weekends, he’s sometimes a silver fox.

I met with Gary Woeltge, Steve Hall and Nick Coughlin, employees at H20 for Life, last October and immediately fell in love with their organization. I, as well as others I assume, so often search for ways that we can help a worthy cause.

In 2010, Steve Hall embarked on a three-week trip to Kenya and Uganda. There, he witnessed a tragedy. Those he met along the way had no access to a vital resource that so many Americans take for granted: water.
   

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