People

Womaness

The secret is out. Menopause exists. And though it’s yet another taboo that women tend to keep to themselves—when 6,000 women enter a four-to-six-year relationship with menopause each day, it’s not a topic that should be kept in the shadows.

St. Paul native F. Scott Fitzgerald is famous for many novels, perhaps none more so than The Great Gatsby. If you’re a fan of his books and short stories, you’re in luck. The F. Scott Fitzgerald Society will be holding the 14th International F. Scott Fitzgerald Society Conference in St.

This June marks the end of Dr. Michael Lovett’s nine years as superintendent of White Bear Lake Area Schools.

Looking back at nearly three decades as a part-time party entertainer-for-hire, clown/magician Roger Rust realized he has been fulfilling a prophecy of sorts. The prophet was Sister Adolpha, his third-grade teacher at Ascension grade school in north Minneapolis.

In the garage of their Mahtomedi home, Dorian and Margie Grilley have more than 15 bikes.

Bob Fletcher is no stranger to public office. His career in civil service began in the early 1980s when he was elected to the St. Paul City Council, followed by 16 years as a Ramsey County sheriff.

Anastasia Eldredge has what some may consider a difficult task—making teenagers love math. But the Mahtomedi High School teacher not only does it, but does it really, really well. “I was born to be a teacher,” Eldredge says.

It’s not a coincidence that six women leaders in White Bear Lake share many of the same traits. They’ve found success and fulfillment not by accident, but rather by seeking out and following their dreams, passions and goals.

Even though Olympic athletes are considered amateurs, training for any Olympic sport has become a year-round job. No one knows that better than Tony Benshoof, a White Bear Lake native, who spends much of his year readying U.S. athletes to compete in international luge competition.

In White Bear, we have choices when it comes to our children’s education, and we don’t need to worry about walking down the street alone.

On any given day, three chickens (Jazzy, Keiko and Peanut) bob, coo, squawk and cluck their way around Janice Cole’s White Bear-area backyard.

Pages